Reader's Encyclopedia

Sandburg, Carl (1878 - 1967)

merican poet. Sandburg is known for his free verse poems celebrating industrial and agricultural America, American geography and landscape, great figures in American history, and the American common people. Strongly influenced by Walt Whitman, he made use of contemporary slang and colloquialisms. He was born in Galesburg, Illinois, left school at thirteen and took odd jobs, traveled West as a hobo, served in the Spanish - American War, and then worked his way through Lombard (now Knox) College in his hometown. He was an advertising writer, a newspaper reporter, a correspondent in Sweden and Norway, and an editorial writer for the Chicago Daily News. Early in his career he evinced socialist sympathies; he worked for the Social - Democrat Party in Wisconsin and later was secretary to the first Socialist mayor of Milwaukee.

After an early pamphlet, In Reckless Ecstasy (1904), Sandburg began publishing his poems in Harriet Monroe ' s Poetry, becoming part of the Chicago literary renaissance (see Chicago Group ). With Chicago Poems (1916) and Cornhuskers, his reputation was established. These volumes were followed in the 1920s by Smoke and Steel, Slabs of the Sunburnt West (1922), Selected Poems (1926), and Good Morning, America (1928). During the same period, Sandburg's energies were directed into three other areas. The most important of these was the beginning of his monumental study Abraham Lincoln. The second was his collection of American folklore, the ballads in The American Songbag, and its successor, The New American Songbag (1950). The third area was writing books for children. Rootabaga Stories, the best known of these, was followed by three others.

In the 1930s Sandburg continued his celebration of America with Mary Lincoln, Wife and Widow (1932), The People, Yes (1936), and the second part of his Lincoln biography, Abraham Lincoln: The War Years (1939). For this he was awarded a Pulitzer Prize; later he received a second Pulitzer Prize for his Complete Poems (1950). His final volumes of verse were Harvest Poems, 1910 - 1960 (1960) and Honey and Salt (1963).

0111011000100101001010011010010011101011010011011110101100000000011110010000101110001110001010011000111000011111101101101111111000
0110010101001011110010011110110011101100111111111001000100010000000010011000101101111001000100101010101101100011010101000111100111
1111100101011010101000010000100011010011010110100111011110011011111001101011000010100010111111011100001001010010101011011101010011
1000011111010100010011110001111010101110110000000010100110001011000101100010100110111001111101011101110000101111000001101101000000
0011000100101101111000001010011101001110010100010011100011111010110101100100111001111100000111011001011001001101101111011001000001
0101110010011100011000100010110111110000111101011000101101110000001110101001101010111100010101111000001000010101100010110001011111
1100110010100010001100110111011101110101111101010001001100100011111111000100100001101011000101000110100011011101100000000101011001
0110011110100111010100011001001011001111100101100111101000010000111000110110000010100000001011000110001110100110011010111010001001
1000100001100001011011100000010001111100100001011110100000111010000111001010010000100000000100110010011000010111011010001011010010
0100101000000010100011110000111011101110111010100111110111001111011101101001110110111111110111001000100110100111000110101000001111
0101010011010001001101001111001101010000001001111001111100000111101011100110011111110111110101101000001001001100100101101001100110
0011111100111011100100011101001100110011100011101001010111001001101110010111110010100101000101010110011110000001010011100111001010
0110100111100000110100101101110101010110100101011000011101111110110101010011101110000110101101110110000011010000110101011111111110
0111001010100010011110000011111001010011001110011000110110101111001100010010101100111111000000111100011001100010011110100000000110